Tag Archives: self-serving politicians

Denying minorities and poor people an education, keeps them ghettoized and voting for Democrats…Shame on Eric Holder

This story is all too emblematic of the problem with today’s liberal agenda. Claiming to defend the interests of poor and minority students through its actions, the Justice Department is doing the bidding of the biggest of the Democrat’s special interest overlords — the teachers’ unions. How can anyone claim to want to help children by denying them the best education available?

The Justice Department’s motion has tremendous human implications, personified by Mary Edler, whose grandsons are using vouchers to attend kindergarten and second grade in a Louisiana private school. All of the public schools in their district are graded C, D or F. Thanks to the scholarship program, Mrs. Edler says, “My grandsons are flourishing at Ascension of Our Lord in all aspects. They have small classes and an outstanding principal and staff.” She calls the tuition vouchers a “true blessing”—one that will be lost if the Justice Department prevails.

In its zeal, the Justice Department has transformed a bipartisan education reform program into a partisan opportunity. On Sept. 17, House Speaker John Boehner and other Republican leaders wrote an open letter to Attorney General Holder, calling Justice’s motion “extremely troubling and paradoxical in nature,” given that it hurts the “very children you profess to be protecting.”

Read it all here.

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George Will: Obama ignoring Constitution | CJOnline.com

George Will: Obama ignoring Constitution | CJOnline.com.

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Where is the outrage?

Our President has unilaterally decided to suspend the implementation of a law (granted a horrible one) passed by congress (granted using the barest of procedurally minimal votes) and he has offered no constitutional justification for his actions. Additionally, the suspension only applies to corporations. Individuals will have to live with the flaws of this law without White House intervention. To further add to this brazen flouting of the separation of powers, he has granted “waivers” to members of Congress and their staffs to ensure that they do not have to suffer the consequences of this “train wreck” of progressive legislation.

Where do we live? How can this stand? Our country’s foundation of freedom is the separation of powers – devised to prevent tyranny by any branch of government. Our free press is supposed to be our diligent watch dog, ready to warn us of abuses and overreach. Where are they now?

This president loves to think of himself in grandiose comparisons with Lincoln (in a stunning exercise of hubris.) This comparison by Nicholas Quinn Rosencrantz, shows exactly how puny those comparison display him to be. But this perspective should not only be found on the editorial page of America’s most conservative paper. It should be everywhere. This is not about partisan politics, it is about the foundations and integrity of our republic.

As Benjamin Franklin left Independence Hall in Philadelphia after the conclusion of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, he was asked, “Well, Doctor, what do we have — a Republic or a Monarchy?” He replied, “A republic, if you can keep it.”

Can we?

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I bought my first handgun…Why?

Last week I purchased my first handgun. It is a .45 caliber Heckler & Koch USP. This is a full-sized, semi-automatic pistol which means that every time you pull the trigger it fires a shot (if the chamber has a round in it.) A .45 caliber is a large and powerful load frequently propelling a bullet that weighs 230 grains or 15 grams. The specific cartridge for my gun is a .45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol.) This cartridge was designed by the legendary John Browning in 1904. He designed it for use in his automatic handgun design, the M1911, so called because of its adoption by the United States army as its official sidearm in 1911. The cartridge is known to have superior “stopping power,” or the ability to do maximum damage to a human target. The gun’s magazine (legal in Connecticut) holds ten of these rounds and can also have one in its chamber for a maximum capacity of 11 cartridges. In other states it is possible to buy a twelve round magazine.

HK-USP1

The gun is German designed and manufactured. Heckler & Koch is a high-end armorer, know for innovative, reliable and durable weapons. It was expensive, costing just about a $1,000. I purchased it after shooting several different handguns, all .45 ACPs. I test-shot a Beretta PX4-Storm, a Ruger 1911, a Glock 21, a Smith & Wesson M&P (Military & Police) and the HK USP. Each of these guns felt very different in terms of grip, recoil, weight, and sight-configuration. I felt most comfortable (and shot most accurately) with the USP so that is what I bought.

Owning this gun comes with a responsibility. It is a weapon designed to deliver deadly force – to kill another human being. Learning its proper operation and safe handling is something that I take very seriously. Storing it properly is very important. When it is in my house, I store it in a biometric gun safe which can only be opened by my fingerprint. I keep its ammunition locked up in a separate place. I try to follow basic safety rules – I always point the gun in a safe direction, never at something I do not want to harm or destroy; I always keep the gun unloaded but assume that it is loaded until I have confirmed it is not;  I do not put my finger on the trigger until I intend to fire and; I know my target and what is beyond it.

I have shot and enjoyed long-guns (rifles and shotguns) since I was twelve years old but until now I did not have an interest in handguns. When I took the Connecticut-required gun safety course at a local shooting range, I found that handguns are fun to shoot and much more challenging and exhilarating than I had ever imagined. Pistols are powerful, skillfully engineered tools and I look forward to becoming proficient in using them.

But why did I decide to buy this gun now? There are many parts to the answer. I first became interested in learning more about handguns when the national debate about gun control was re-kindled by the tragedy at Sandy Hook, CT, a mere 18 miles away from my home. As I observed the emotional and non-rational response to the tragedy and saw shameless politicians move swiftly to exploit it, I became concerned that the right to obtain a handgun was at risk of being taken away. And I believe that owning one may be a more important right than ever before.

For a number of reasons, I feel far less confident and secure about my family’s safety and my ability to protect them. We live in an affluent community that is only miles away from severe urban poverty. The national dialogue about income inequality, the vilification of capitalism, media caricatures of greed-driven, soulless corporations, our country’s confiscatory tax regime and the redistributionist rhetoric of the current administration are all of a piece. In today’s America, I have come to believe that protecting my home and family, and securing my personal property from conventional criminals or from the ones in our government are ultimately my own responsibilities.

Will I need a handgun to do this? If confronted by a home invader, would I be able and willing to use deadly force? I am not sure. I need to continue to practicing with my pistol and become expert in its use. When it comes down to protecting my family, I want to have every available tool and advantage. Though it may present me with hard choices to make, as a legally licensed handgun owner, I at least have the freedom to make those choices.

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The IRS Scandal Isn’t About Partisan Politics…

I know that my many liberal friends will think that The IRS Scandal is a partisan issue because conservatives were attacked. But this is about something far more troubling than partisan politics. It is about a government bureaucracy that is unaccountable. With a change in political fortunes, the IRS could just as easily target liberal organizations. The entire machine needs to be profoundly reformed and its duty to be fair and impartial needs to paramount and unquestionable. Are any of my liberal friends equally concerned?

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Response to a Cynical political hack from Connecticut

Connecticut’s Senator Blumenthal published a letter in the Hartford Courant professing his shame at his colleagues and his disappointment at the failure of the Senate to pass “common sense” (talking point language from a careful ‘positioning’ document just like a ‘balanced’ approach to deficit reductions means higher taxes and no meaningful cuts in entitlement spending) gun control legislation. He vowed to fight on. He sent his letter to his constituents who have written him about gun violence. He sent it to me and here is my reply:

 

 

Senator Blumenthal,

What common sense is there in enacting cynical, opportunistic legislation that does absolutely nothing to solve the problem it purports to address? SHAME ON YOU for trying to exploit tragedy to advance a disproven agenda that curtails constitutionally enumerated rights and does nothing to advance public safety. You know that all rifles, much less the cosmetically defined “assault weapons” are used in a single digit percentage of all gun crimes. You know that magazine size limitations will have no impact on criminals who have ready access to whatever size magazine they want but will ensure that law abiding citizens are overmatched or limited in their ability to protect themselves. You know that these same criminals will easily circumvent background checks and that of the “2 million people prevented by background checks from buying firearms” virtually none have been prosecuted – what do you think they did next? You know that, as your esteemed colleague Diane Feinstein admitted, background checks would not have succeeded in preventing the tragedies that you so shamelessly seek to exploit.
Why don’t you try to do something real about gun violence? The violence that disproportionally affects poor black males in our cities? Why don’t you stand up for mandatory sentencing to prevent recidivists from committing multiple gun crimes? We know these criminals can get guns. We know they use them in crimes. We know that they will do it again but we still let them go free.
Why don’t you help our country follow New York city’s successful implementation of ‘stop and frisk’ policies in our cities? Wouldn’t Bridgeport, Hartford and New Haven benefit from a reduction in gun violence? How about Chicago and its “tough gun laws?”
And when it comes to mass murderers, why don’t you advance better systems for mental health professionals to raise the alarm when they see patients who are likely to commit violent acts? Can you come up with a respectful, fair and thoughtful way to connect them to law enforcement officials and the NICs system?
I guess that would take uncommon courage, brains and effort – things utterly absent throughout your political career. “Common sense” as you define it is so much easier. Exploit a distraught mother – ask her to attend congressional hearings while she is still grieving and vulnerable and by all means have her talk to the press. Those are “common sense” ways to help her heal.
Told anybody about your distinguished military service in Vietnam lately?
Sincerely indignant and ashamed that you are my senator,
Critical Thinking
Weston, CT
PS – To the staffer who may have actually read this before chalking up one “anti” and throwing it in the bin, I hope you are proud to be working for such an upstanding public figure…Go do something honorable with your life (isn’t that why you got into politics?) and dump this sorry hack Blumenthal.

 

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“Conservatives” care more about doing the right thing for the needy than “liberals” do

Albert C. Brooks in today’s Wall Street Journal:

Conservatives are fighting a losing battle of moral arithmetic. They hand an argument with virtually 100% public support—care for the vulnerable—to progressives, and focus instead on materialistic concerns and minority moral viewpoints.

The irony is maddening. America’s poor people have been saddled with generations of disastrous progressive policy results, from welfare-induced dependency to failing schools that continue to trap millions of children.

Meanwhile, the record of free enterprise in improving the lives of the poor both here and abroad is spectacular. According to Columbia University economist Xavier Sala-i-Martin, the percentage of people in the world living on a dollar a day or less—a traditional poverty measure—has fallen by 80% since 1970. This is the greatest antipoverty achievement in world history. That achievement is not the result of philanthropy or foreign aid. It occurred because billions of souls have been able to pull themselves out of poverty thanks to global free trade, property rights, the rule of law and entrepreneurship.

Progressive policies achieve the opposite of what they say they set out to do. A cynic would say that the only thing they succeed in doing is trapping dependent voters for future elections. I think most liberals believe that these policies are helping and want that help to be successful. But they don’t pay much attention to outcomes. And they consistently defer doing their own analysis and instead trust people who are far more cynical — see the number of Democrats that get caught with their hands in the progressive till. Jessie Jackson, Jr., Charlie Rangel, Pedro Espada just to name a few.

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